Tag Hippocampus Magazine

Magazine Stand :: Hippocampus Magazine – July/August 2022

Hippocampus literary magazine logo

Hippocampus Magazine online issue 114 features a variety of creative nonfiction, including “Pulses” by Kathy Davis, “Bathymetry” by Sally Jonson, “Foreign” by Terri Lewis, “Peephole” by Lotus Mae, “Origin Myths” by Susan V. Meyers, “We Had No Woman” by Ronit Plank, “What I Wrote Was Congratulations What I Meant to Say Was” by Rachel Lincoln Sarnoff, “The Dying Room” by Leanne Pierce Schneider, “There Are Girls Like You in Japan” by Mimi Iimuro Van Ausdall, and “De-escalation” by Lauren Woods. Read it online here. Hippocampus will also be hosting HippoCamp 2022: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers – August 12-14, in Lancaster, PA. Find more information here.

Magazine Stand :: Hippocampus – March/April 2022

Hippocampus literary magazine logo

Hippocampus Magazine, with a three-fold mission to “entertain, educate, and engage writers and readers of creative nonfiction,” strikes again with its newest issue, featuring works by Charlotte Adamis, Diane Simmons, Charlotte Maya, Christian Harrington, Mikaela Osler, Laura Stanfill, Sophie Ezzell, Deborah Sherman, Danielle Joffe, and Celeste Hawkins. Also included are interviews with Mary Laura Philpott, Andrea Thatcher, “Imagine You Are Ophelia in Hamlet’s Castle, and Other Craft Ideas Borrowed From Acting” by Lori Yeghiayan Friedman, and a Writing Life feature with Brian Watson. All free and open access – check them out today!

Hippocampus Magazine – Jan-Feb 2022

The first issue of year went live last month, but don’t forget Hippocampus Magazine refreshes each bimonthly issue with new columns, reviews, and interviews. This month, find Laura Sturza sharing how a writing community rocked her writing world in the WRITING LIFE column, plus find two Q&As with Suzanne Roberts and Galit Atlas. New to the reviews section: Emily Maloney reviewed by Sandra Hager Eliason, Victoria Chang reviewed by Ashley Supinski, Odyssey of Ashes: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Letting Go reviewed by Rachael J. Hughes, and Alexis Paige reviewed by Daphnee McMaster. Don’t forget in January Hippocampus featured nonfiction by Sara Tatyana Bernstein, Michelle DeLiso, Katharine M. Emlen, Melanie Figg, Farah Habib, Mark O. Hodgson, Ali Kojak, Veena K. Siddarth, Shell St. James, Tatyana M. Sussex, and Karen Winn.

Stop by the Hippocampus Magazine website to read the refreshed January-February 2022 issue.

Hippocampus Magazine November/December 2021

Let’s take a peek inside the newest issue of Hippocampus Magazine; inside, you’ll find essays and flash CNF such as: “Up” by Michelle Bailat-Jones, “Seeing Bone” by Emma Bruce, “Teeth” by Gavin Paul Colton, “How to Preserve a Body” by Lauren Cross, “What I Took After She Died in the Memory Care Wing” by Irene Fick, “Rewind” by Jennifer Fliss, “German Lessons” by Sue Mell, and more. See what else to expect in this issue at the Mag Stand.

Hippocampus Magazine – October 2021

Inside, you’ll find essays and flash creative nonfiction by writers including: Sophie Scolnik-Brower, Morgan Eklund, Kathryn Fitzpatrick, Joey Garcia, Karen Green, Nita Noveno, Jess Payne, Sherry Shahan, Gary Smothers, Hannah Smothers, and Hillary Wentworth. Our new edition also features an articles section full of reviews, interviews, and columns. More info at the Hippocampus Magazine website.

Hippocampus Magazine – July/August 2021

The July/August issue is live! Inside, you’ll find essays and flash CNF such as: “Lake of the Ozarks, Osage Beach, Missouri” by Dawn-Michelle Baude, “A Very Good Liar” by Erin Branning, “Sharp” by Vanessa Chan, “11,000 People Lying Facedown on the Burnside Bridge” by Benjamin McPherson Ficklin, “Warsaw Ghetto Boy” by Sharon Goldman, and more. See more content at the Hippocampus Magazine website.

Books by Hippocampus to Publish HippoCamp-Inspired Craft Anthology

“It’s the best writing conference you’ve ever attended, in book form!”

Getting to the Truth coverBooks by HippoCampus is excited to announce the publication of an anthology inspired by HippoCamp, an annual nonfiction conference, dedicated to writing creative nonfiction and what it means to be a writer who tells true stories.

Getting to the  Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative Nonfiction, edited by Rae Pagliarulo and Donna Talarico, is set to be released on August 11 and will be available for pre-orders on July 5. It features 20+ craft essays offering thoughtful insights from some of the highest rated HippoCamp speakers. It also features wise writers behind some of Hippocampus Magazine‘s most-read craft columns.

Speaking of HippoCamp, they have released the full schedule for this year’s conference set to to take place August 13-15 in Lancaster, PA. As of this writing, there are only 80 spots currently available.

Hippocampus Announces HippoCamp 2021 is a Go!

HippoCamp logo on light purple backgroundHippocampus Magazine and Books has announced that they will be hosting their annual 3-day creative writing conference this summer in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

If you haven’t heard about HippoCamp before, it is geared toward creative nonfiction writers of all skill levels and backgrounds and is formatted “in the style of a professional development, industry conference.” They feature solo presenters passionate about their topics rather than panel discussions. There you can hone your craft, explore publishing options, and find ways to balance your writing and real life while meeting new friends to learn from and share with.

This year’s conference will take place August 13-15, 2021.

They offer additional pre-conference workshops you can apply to as well as add-ons, like book sale space. As of this writing there are 102 spots remaining, so if you’re interested in nonfiction and learning more and honing your craft, don’t forget to register soon.

 

What the Heart Remembers

Guest Post by Kelsie Peterson.

Catherine Young’s essay, “In That River I Saw Him Again,” published online in November 2020 by Hippocampus Magazine, reads like a coal train passing by you. It is full of glimpses of beauty and wonder, as well as the past, with a poetic through line that moves like the “shadows” Young describes. Using the imagery of coal trains from her childhood, photographs, and early motion pictures, Young’s essay wonders at the idea of memory, of life, and of those lost in her childhood.

The central question running through this essay is, “What can the heart remember? Young invites readers to discover an answer with her as moving pictures first allow her father to come alive once more, and then ultimately, her uncle. Young’s writing offers a unique and engaging perspective on the life of memory.

What engaged me most as a reader was this piece’s inventive use of engaging imagery and repetition of poetic meditations. The reading experience mirrored that of a train passing or of the flicker of the early motion picture. The flashes of ideas flowed together in a truly unforgettable piece.


In That River I Saw Him Again” by Catherine Young. Hippocampus Magazine, November 2020.

Reviewer bio: Kelsie Peterson is completing her last semester at Utah State University and will graduate with her MS in English.