Tag: Crazyhorse

  • Crazyhorse – Fall 2021

    Featuring the 2021 Crazyhorse prize winners in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, Mary Clark, Jung Hae Chae, and Mark Wagenaar; a debut story from Nancy Nguyen; fiction from Nicole VanderLinden, Weston Cutter, and Timothy Mullaney; an essay from A.C. Zhang; and poems from Lisa Low, Michael Prior, Mary Kaiser, Jose Hernandez Diaz, and Mehrnoosh Torbatnejad, among others. Now on Crazyhorse website.

  • Crazyhorse – Fall 2020

    This issue features poetry by Kamilah Aisha Moon, Hadara Bar-Nadav, Daniel Schonning, and Amy Fleury; fiction by Jackie Thomas-Kennedy, Mi Jin Kim, and Jack Ortiz; and essays by Dawn D’Aries. Read more at the Crazyhorse website.

  • Eulogy for a Father

    Magazine Review by Katy Haas

    At a time when I felt incredibly alone, Ira Sukrungruang kept me company with his collection of essays, Buddha’s Dog: & Other Meditations. I stayed up all night reading it, telling myself I’d just read one more essay and then sleep and before I knew it, the book was finished and dawn was right around the corner. So now when I again feel those nagging feelings of loneliness, I was excited to see he had a new nonfiction piece in the Spring 2020 issue of Crazyhorse to help fill in the spaces around me: “Eulogy for My Father.”

    This eulogy is written in short, one-sentence paragraphs that rapidly fall down the sixteen pages they occupy. “Let me start again,” he repeatedly states and follows another thread as he sorts the complicated thoughts and feelings surrounding the relationship he had with his father, his father’s absence, and the ways in which these feelings now echo over his relationship with his son.

    The piece is honest and tender, bringing tears to my eyes by the time I reached the end and his final “restart.” It was nice seeing Sukrungruang once again show off his mastery of the nonfiction form. Even sitting with his grief, it was also nice to feel close to something for the moment.

  • Crazyhorse – Spring 2020

    The Spring 2020 issue is here and it features the winner of the Crazyshorts! Short-Short Fiction Competition (“Spinning Stories” by Bailey Cunningham) alongside outstanding stories, essays, and poems by Rebecca Morgan Frank, Afabwaje Kurian, Iheoma Nwachukwu, W. Scott Olsen, Ira Sukrungruang, Amy M. Alvarez, and more. Read more at the Crazyhorse website.

  • Contest :: Crazyhorse’s Crazyshorts! Contest Opens July 1

    Deadline: July 31, 2020
    July 1 is tomorrow which means Crazyhorse‘s annual Crazyshorts! competition will be officially open to submissions. From July 1st to July 31st, Crazyhorse will accept entries for our annual short-short fiction contest. Submit 3 short-shorts of up to 500 words each through our website: crazyhorse.cofc.edu. First place wins $1,000 and publication; 3 runners-up will be announced. All entries will be considered for publication; the $15 entry fee includes a one-year subscription to Crazyhorse. For more information, visit: crazyhorse.cofc.edu/crazyshorts.

  • Contest :: Crazyhorse’s 2020 Crazy Shorts! Contest

    Deadline: July 31, 2020
    From July 1st to July 31st, Crazyhorse will accept entries for our annual short-short fiction contest. Submit 3 short-shorts of up to 500 words each through our website: crazyhorse.cofc.edu. First place wins $1,000 and publication; 3 runners-up will be announced. All entries will be considered for publication; the $15 entry fee includes a one-year subscription to Crazyhorse. For more information, visit: crazyhorse.cofc.edu/crazyshorts.

  • “Owosso” by Mary Birnbaum

    Crazyhorse - Fall 2019Magazine Review by Katy Haas

    Mary Birnbaum’s nonfiction piece “Owosso” caught my eye in the latest issue of Crazyhorse, not only because it’s the winner of the Crazyhorse Nonfiction Prize, but because it’s a familiar name (though a surprise to see in a national literary journal); the tiny town in Michigan is a mere hour away from where I’ve lived my whole life. It’s also where Birnbaum’s grandfather lived, she learns as she reads his obituary at the gym. This discovery leads her on an exploration of the concept of ghosts and hauntings.

    Across the country, Birnbaum writes of the ghostly characters of The Turn of the Screw by Henry James and personal ghost stories shared by two friends. This leads her to look at the ghosts of her own life. These are not supernatural beings haunting the darkness, but are her father and her grandfather, two strangers removed from her life.

    Birnbaum’s thoughts about her father and grandfather are complex and complicated. She breaks her ideas apart into small chunks, making them easily digestible as she bounces back and forth between ghost stories, the “what-ifs” of finding and confronting her father, and her discovery at the gym. At one point she wonders, “if it’s worse to be a ghost or to be haunted. I wonder if both are possible in me,” leading me to consider the ways in which I myself am a ghost or am being haunted in my own life.

    As the essay wraps up, Birnbaum decides to label Owosso a mythical location. But while the small city is something separated from herself, it did conjure up from the shadows a tiny, welcomed connection between writer and this reader.

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