Blink-Ink

Magazine Stand :: Blink Ink – #49

Blink Ink print literary magazine issue #49 cover image

Publishing stories “of approximately 50 words” in print since 2009, Blink-Ink has persevered through the pandemic – thanks to continued subscriber support – and plans to forge ahead despite the rising costs of print. The publication offers four “seasonal” issues per year, but also provides bonus joy to subscribers by including publications from their sister imprint, The Mambo Academy of Kitty Wang at least twice a year, as well as other “goodies and surprises.” The newest edition of Blink-Ink is themed “Storm” and features works from thirty contributors in a nifty 4.25″x5.5″ package. “Country Roads” is the newest theme, with submissions open until October 15.

Magazine Stand :: Blink-Ink – #48

Blink Ink literary magazine issue 48 cover image

Blink-Ink is an adorable little lit mag, but don’t let its 4×5 zine-style format or 50-words or less per submission fool you – this is a powerhouse fiction publication – as previously reviewed on NewPages. Thematic by issue, the theme for #48 is “Rumors” and includes works by Beret Olsen, Nancy Stohlman, Jon Fain, Judith Shapiro, Lou Storey, Jennifer Mills Kerr, Mark Budman, Karen Lillis, Crystal Bonano, Daryl Scroggins, Mike Yunxuan Li, Liz Mayers, Catfish McDaris, Renuka Raghavan, Karen Lillis, Lindsey-Loon Ricker, Patricia Woods, Bryan Jansing, Gay Degani, Micahel Fagan, and Saif Sidari with photography by Alix Rhone Fancher. Visit their website for submission guidelines and upcoming themes.

Call :: Blink-Ink “Mercy”

“Mercy, mercy, mercy me. / Where did all the blue skies go? / Poison is the wind that blows…”—”Mercy, mercy, me” by Marvin Gaye
Mercy will be the theme of Blink-Ink’s December issue. We are quite serious about this one. Humor or satire will certainly be considered, but it must be relevant. Send us your best, unpublished work of approximately 50 words in the body of an email to: blinkinkinfo@gmail.com. Submissions are open September 1st, through Oct. 15th. No poetry, attachments, or bios please. “What we want, what we need, is civic grace and mercy.”—Senator Cory Gardner

Call :: Blink Ink Seeks Home Cooking

Mom’s mac and cheese with cocktail wieners or a favorite meal you like to make. Tasty fare or a hard slog through a dismally over-done Sunday dinner. Dining delights dreamed of when there is little to hand. What else can we “cook up at home”, a plan, a scheme intertwined with adventure. Sure smells good, so tell us in fifty words or so what’s cooking be it real, imagined, or impossible. Submissions are open June 1st through July 15th. Send submissions in the body of an email to blinkinkinfo@gmail.com. No poetry, bios, or attachments please. www.blink-ink.org/submissions/

Call :: Blink-Ink Road Trip Issue

Those same old four walls getting you down? Nothing going on, and not likely to? A road trip is the only cure. Time to get out of Dodge! So where to go, or does it matter? The time to pack up and go is now. Tell us your tails of the trails, your songs of the highway, be they real, imagined, or seemingly impossible in stories approximately 50 words in length. Send your submissions in the body of an email to: blinkinkinfo@gmail.com. No poetry, attachments, or bios please. Submissions are open now through April 15th, 2020. www.blink-ink.org

Blink-Ink – True Crime Issue

Blink Ink - Issue 38

Magazine Review by Katy Haas

True crime seems to be all the rage lately, from books on famous cold cases to Netflix documentaries to hit podcasts. Blink-Ink tries its hand at covering this theme in Issue 38 wherein 16 writers use micro-fiction to explore true crime.

JR Walsh writes about a B&E at an ex’s house where the criminals’ “fingerprints never moved out.” Katie Yates writes of a husband who steals a puppy for his wife. In Craig Fishbane’s “Weapon of Choice,” one weapon is social media, the other is a gun. Leah Rogin-Roper provides four related pieces on a juvenile detention center. The stories in this issue cover a wide array of crimes in creative ways, and it’s fun to see a fictional take on truth.

Blink-Ink publishes stories that are 50 words or less. This makes for short, snappy stories that toss readers headfirst into the drama. In this issue, we never have to wait long to find out who did it in these whodunnits.