• The Antioch Review – Summer 2019

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    The Antioch Review Summer 2019 issue opens with postmodernist African-American painter and printmaker Emma Amos’ 1957 Antioch College senior paper about her education as an artist whose works are currently scheduled to go to the Smithsonian. Investigative reporter Jay Tuck’s “Mankind’s Greatest Challenge: Artificial Intelligence” is a well-founded call for caution in what has become the wild west of virtual reality. Mika Seifert’s “Old Timers” will send chills up your spine and “Coming in on Time” by Stuart Neville will have you reaching for tissues. Our poetry selection rounds out this issue that once again delivers the best words in the best order.

  • 2019 Rattle Poetry Prize Winner & Finalists

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    Rattle - Winter 2019Pick up the Winter 2019 issue of Rattle for the Rattle Poetry Prize winner and finalists.

    Winner
    “Stroke” by Matthew Dickman

    Finalists
    “Punch Line” by Kathleen Balma
    “Bonanza” by Susan Browne
    “Mother and Child” by Barbara Lydecker Crane
    “Foreign-ness” by Maya Tevet Dayan
    “Cathedrals: Ode to a Deported Uncle” by Daniel Arias Gómez
    “The Never-Ending Serial” by Red Hawk
    “Gender Studies” by Sue Howell
    “From Oblivious Waters” by Kimberly Kemler
    “Red in Tooth and Claw” by James Davis May
    “Self-Portrait, Despite What They Say” by Gabrielle Otero

    Along with the winner and finalists, there are twenty-three other poets included in this issue in the “Open Poetry section.”

  • “How does one not write a depressing book about depression?”

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    Book cover of The Scar by Mary CreganCaoilinn Hughes talks with Mary Cregan about her new book The Scar. …But this book is far more than a memoir: it is the result of decades of research on the medical history of the diagnosis, as well as the classification and treatment of depression and melancholia. To this rigorous and fascinating scholarship, Cregan has added the work of a variety of artists—from the ancient Greeks to Leonard Cohen. No surprise, then, that she teaches literature at Barnard College.

    For a long time I couldn’t figure out how to write the book because the subject is seen by most people as “depressing.” How does one not write a depressing book about depression? Add to that the trigger of the death of an infant, and it seemed a daunting thing to invite readers to enter into. Death, grief, suicide, illness: these are subjects that a lot of people prefer to avoid thinking about.

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  • Two Poems by Bill Snyder

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    Weber - Fall 2019Magazine Review by Katy Haas

    The Fall 2019 issue of Weber includes two poems by Bill Snyder: “Redundancy” and “Home.”

    Snyder travels through time in these poems. In “Home,” he brings us to 1972 as he hitchhikes to his father’s house in Florida to surprise him with his arrival, and in “Redundancy,” he brings us to 1995 while he plays Scrabble with his mother.

    Snyder writes with clarity, each poem rich with description that never bogs the message down. Each feels like a tiny short story, grabbing readers and pulling them into the scene. We are sitting at the table with his mother, “sunlight seeping in.” We are standing on the side of the road waiting in the humid air for a car to stop, “the sun behind a Burger King, Kentucky Fried, / all the rest.”

    These poems are a pleasure to read, an intimate gaze at the familial bonds of Snyder’s speaker.

  • Caitlin O’Neil Wins Danahy Fiction Prize

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    Caitlin O'Neil [cropped headshot]The editors of Tampa Review are pleased to announce that Caitlin O’Neil, of Milton, Massachusetts, has won the thirteenth annual Danahy Fiction Prize for her short story entitled “Mark.”  She will receive an award of $1,000, and the story will be published in the forthcoming Spring/Summer issue of Tampa Review.

    O’Neil is a graduate of the MFA program at Columbia University and currently teaches in the English Department at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She says that her winning story came directly from her life experiences as a college professor and as a human being living in America today.

    “I watched multiple school shootings unfold on television with sadness and fear,” O’Neil says. “Given the gridlock around gun control, I began to think about what a world that had adjusted to guns and gun violence might look like.”

    O’Neil’s story is set in a near-future in which guns become an even more pervasive part of the culture.

    Learn more about the winning story and the runners up here: tiny.cc/danahyprize13.

  • NewPages January 2020 Digital eLitPak

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    NewPages has sent out our monthly digital eLitPak to current newsletter subscribers this afternoon. Not a subscriber yet? Sign up here: npofficespace.com/newpages-newsletter/.

    Besides our monthly eLitPak featuring fliers from literary magazines, independent presses, and creative writing programs and events, we have a weekly newsletter filled with submission opportunities, literary magazines, new titles, reviews, and more.

    Check out the current eLitPak below. You can view the original newsletter email here. (more…)

  • 2019 Zone 3 Literary Awards Winners

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    Zone 3 - Fall 2019Find the Fiction and Poetry winners of the 2019 Zone 3 Literary Awards in the Fall 2019 issue. Winners were chosen by the genre editors.

    Fiction
    “Five Variations on Parnell’s Blues” by Matthew Fiander

    Poetry
    “Sandy” by Jasmine Dreame Wagner

    For more contest winners, readers can pick up the Spring 2019 issue to check out the winner of the nonfiction prize: “In Praise of the Plains” by Sarah Fawn Montgomery. The Literary Awards are currently open until April 1.

  • Joy Harjo: ” Everyone wants a place where they feel safe”

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    Joy Harjo An American SunriseYou once said that poetry “directly or inadvertently mirrors the state of the state.” And I wonder what you think the state of the state is right now?

    Everyone wants a place where they feel safe, where they feel like they might know what’s going to happen tomorrow and that they could wake up in a universe in which they feel supported. Where we know we can practice our ways and not be jailed or censored or anything. Most people want that. But I think the state of the state is marked by a great insecurity, a great insecurity running through everyone, whatever so-called side you’re on. And so I think people are really looking for connection and trust to build some kind of stability — and for some kind of leadership in which we have leaders who are trusted because they have a history of compassion, of knowledge, and they’re willing to work across any kind of political lines. Those are real leaders. The real leaders care about the people, not about the opinion of those who are going to give them money for their campaigns. Read more…

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  • Let’s All Read More Fiction

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    Birdie short fiction in The Atlantic magazineOver the centuries, The Atlantic has prized great storytelling. Now we’re setting out to publish fiction with far greater frequency than we’ve managed in the past decade, starting today with “Birdie,” a new story by Lauren Groff.

    Contemplative reading might be viewed as a minor act of rebellion in the internet age. At a time when every available surface is saturated in information, it sometimes seems as though facts are absorbed osmotically, even accidentally, just by moving through space and time. And although the internet is not the perfect opposite of the novel, as some people have argued, it makes fairly efficient work of splintering attention and devouring time. Literary reading—of fiction and of poetry, the kind of reading that commands moral and emotional reflection—is far too easily set aside.

  • Frontier Poetry Partners with Antioch University LA for New Fellowship

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    Frontier Poetry Antioch MFA Fellowship PrizeOnline literary magazine Frontier Poetry announces a new fellowship in partnership with the creative writing program at Antioch University Los Angeles.

    The Antioch-Frontier Fellowship allows the winner to experience one of Antioch University LA’s MFA residencies first-hand. This includes 10 days of intense learning and immersion with mentorship and community opportunities. The fellow can choose between the Summer 2020 residency or the Winter 2021 residency.

    The fellowship will cover travel expenses and lodging. Also, it awards a $1,000 cash prize to cover any additional expenses. The Winner will also be published on the Frontier Poetry website. February 15 application deadline. The Editors of Frontier Poetry and staff of Antioch University will select the winner. Learn more about the fellowship at Frontier Poetry‘s website.